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13-Mar-2018 10:54

“I was pretty good and made quite a bit of money that way.She’d never ask for it, but I loved to provide my mother with a few extra dollars to help out when I could.”“We lived a simple life with many of our needs coming directly from our garden,” he said.Rolando Herrera and his wife Lorena had a dream — create their own Napa Valley winery. Waking early one morning, Rolando turned to his wife and said, “We have to call it Mi Sueño.”“When we first started dating I knew he’d have his own winery someday — it was his dream and I always knew that, so the name made perfect sense,” Lorena said as we sat in their warehouse winery just south of downtown Napa.

I lived back in Mexico until I was 15 and then told them I was moving back to Napa.”As Rolando explained it, the idea of leaving Mexico and heading off to America at such a young age might seem strange to many now, but at that time it was normal because, “I was considered an adult at 15 and so my parents agreed.”“It was crowded, but I was busy going to school and working, so I didn’t notice it much,” he said.

During the entire visit both Rolando and Lorena had talked passionately about wine, their family and the adventure of building what has become one of the bright stars in the crowded night sky of wines in the Napa Valley.

By the end I, too, had come to understand that there was only one name for their winery, Mi Sueño — Spanish for “My Dream.”Rolando was born and grew up in El Llano, a small village in the state of Michoacán, Mexico.

“It made me feel at home and that I could contribute in a real way to what they were doing.”After Potelle, he was hired as winemaker at Vine Cliff Winery and then director of winemaking at Paul Hobbs.

He’d been dating Lorena for a few years, and in 1997 they married and started their own winery.“It was really tough to make things work at first,” Rolando said.

I lived back in Mexico until I was 15 and then told them I was moving back to Napa.”As Rolando explained it, the idea of leaving Mexico and heading off to America at such a young age might seem strange to many now, but at that time it was normal because, “I was considered an adult at 15 and so my parents agreed.”“It was crowded, but I was busy going to school and working, so I didn’t notice it much,” he said.

During the entire visit both Rolando and Lorena had talked passionately about wine, their family and the adventure of building what has become one of the bright stars in the crowded night sky of wines in the Napa Valley.

By the end I, too, had come to understand that there was only one name for their winery, Mi Sueño — Spanish for “My Dream.”Rolando was born and grew up in El Llano, a small village in the state of Michoacán, Mexico.

“It made me feel at home and that I could contribute in a real way to what they were doing.”After Potelle, he was hired as winemaker at Vine Cliff Winery and then director of winemaking at Paul Hobbs.

He’d been dating Lorena for a few years, and in 1997 they married and started their own winery.“It was really tough to make things work at first,” Rolando said.

“The tanks, the smells of fermenting wine and the aroma and feel of the earth in the vineyards were wonderful.”After working at Stag’s Leap, Rolando was hired as assistant winemaker for Marketta and Jean-Noel Fourmeaux at their old-school style Chateau Potelle, located on Mount Veeder.