Amarok keeps updating collection

29-Jan-2018 12:25

The main premise of this complaint about programming interviews is that a programmer is a programmer is a programmer, and the details don’t matter, and that’s straight-up bullshit. If the overall software system will be distributed, then the architecture needs to take rollout into consideration.

Shrugging off context is only a professional qualification for field-goal kickers. I don’t think it’s used much (if at all) for stud wall construction, but it is occasionally used for post-and-beam construction, which involves either metal brackets or traditional cut joinery, and for nonstructural finishings.

I have no doubt that the industry is full of coders banging out one CRUD app after another, but their work bears a lot more relation to architects customizing a house design to a particular site (or, a better analogy, 19th-century railroad engineers applying the standard truss designs to design bridge after bridge) than it does to contractors framing house after house based on the designs they’re handed.

There’s always a terrific slight of hand going on when software developers try to draw analogies to other fields.

Blue-collar credentials and being treated like a unique, creative, and highly-paid professional just aren’t compatible.

Those aren’t the guys you’re going to bend over backwards to hire to frame your walls.

The whole story seems to be built on the premise that the only skill a carpenter has is the ability to drive a nail straight, making any notion of an “interview” farcical. There’s a hell of a difference between a framer, a cabinet-maker, and a furniture-maker. There is, however, a lot of brown stain, and brown shingling, and brown brick. Questions like this are exactly how a good interviewer separates a blinkered newbie from an expert with perspective.

I have no doubt that the industry is full of coders banging out one CRUD app after another, but their work bears a lot more relation to architects customizing a house design to a particular site (or, a better analogy, 19th-century railroad engineers applying the standard truss designs to design bridge after bridge) than it does to contractors framing house after house based on the designs they’re handed.There’s always a terrific slight of hand going on when software developers try to draw analogies to other fields.Blue-collar credentials and being treated like a unique, creative, and highly-paid professional just aren’t compatible.Those aren’t the guys you’re going to bend over backwards to hire to frame your walls.The whole story seems to be built on the premise that the only skill a carpenter has is the ability to drive a nail straight, making any notion of an “interview” farcical. There’s a hell of a difference between a framer, a cabinet-maker, and a furniture-maker. There is, however, a lot of brown stain, and brown shingling, and brown brick. Questions like this are exactly how a good interviewer separates a blinkered newbie from an expert with perspective.Among other things: I’ve never met anyone in the software industry who is happy with the hiring process, and that includes everyone who’s designed the process.