Global personnel dating

22-Jan-2018 01:52

However, Presidents Xi and Duterte have made efforts to improve bilateral relations, and this appears to be paying dividends for China.

Two-thirds of Filipinos (67%) now say it is more important to have a strong economic relationship with China than it is to be tough with China on territorial disputes, while 28% say the opposite.

On five key domestic issues, around two-thirds or more approve of the job Duterte is doing.

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and its president, though still strong, are down from their Obama-era highs.In addition to approving of Duterte’s approach to the war on drugs, a majority (62%) believes the government is making progress in its campaign against illegal drugs, while 21% say that things are the same as they were in the past and 15% say the government is losing ground.While large majorities of both less-educated and more-educated Filipinos approve of Duterte’s handling of the illegal-drugs issue, these two groups differ on their views of the government’s overall progress in its fight against drugs. are down 14 percentage points since 2015 (when Barack Obama was the U. president), which coincides with a global decline in U. favorability at the beginning of the Donald Trump era.Duterte and his war on drugs are seen positively by most Filipinos By Jacob Poushter and Caldwell Bishop Rodrigo Duterte claimed the presidency of the Philippines in May 2016, and six months later Donald Trump won the U. presidency, capping a year of electoral surprises around the world. Currently, 69% have confidence in Trump to do the right thing in world affairs, compared with 94% who expressed such confidence in Obama in 2015. military personnel based in the Philippines is a good thing for the country and 68% assume the U. would use military force to defend their country from China. And on global economic status, about half of Filipinos (49%) say that the U. is still the leading economic power, but that is down from 66% who said this in 2015.While Trump’s first months in office have had a major impact on worldwide perceptions of the U. Despite these drops, people in the Philippines still support the U. military presence in the region and say that the U. would defend them should they get into a conflict with China. Meanwhile, a quarter now name China as the world’s leading economy, up from 14% the last time the Philippines was surveyed.

and its president, though still strong, are down from their Obama-era highs.

In addition to approving of Duterte’s approach to the war on drugs, a majority (62%) believes the government is making progress in its campaign against illegal drugs, while 21% say that things are the same as they were in the past and 15% say the government is losing ground.

While large majorities of both less-educated and more-educated Filipinos approve of Duterte’s handling of the illegal-drugs issue, these two groups differ on their views of the government’s overall progress in its fight against drugs. are down 14 percentage points since 2015 (when Barack Obama was the U. president), which coincides with a global decline in U. favorability at the beginning of the Donald Trump era.

Duterte and his war on drugs are seen positively by most Filipinos By Jacob Poushter and Caldwell Bishop Rodrigo Duterte claimed the presidency of the Philippines in May 2016, and six months later Donald Trump won the U. presidency, capping a year of electoral surprises around the world. Currently, 69% have confidence in Trump to do the right thing in world affairs, compared with 94% who expressed such confidence in Obama in 2015. military personnel based in the Philippines is a good thing for the country and 68% assume the U. would use military force to defend their country from China. And on global economic status, about half of Filipinos (49%) say that the U. is still the leading economic power, but that is down from 66% who said this in 2015.

While Trump’s first months in office have had a major impact on worldwide perceptions of the U. Despite these drops, people in the Philippines still support the U. military presence in the region and say that the U. would defend them should they get into a conflict with China. Meanwhile, a quarter now name China as the world’s leading economy, up from 14% the last time the Philippines was surveyed.

But Filipinos also share positive views of China and its leader, President Xi Jinping. And despite Filipinos being the most pro-Trump nation in Pew Research Center’s spring 37-country survey, confidence in Trump now is lower than trust in then-President Barack Obama was in 2015. has been involved militarily with the Philippines dating back to 1898, when U. forces seized the islands in the Spanish-American War. This represents a dramatic shift since this question was last asked in 2015; at that time, Filipinos were almost evenly divided between forging a strong economic relationship with China (43%) and being tough on territorial disputes (41%).